The Adjustment Bureau

12 06 2012

By Julia Indigo/@juliaindigo

This post went out this morning with out the proper editing! I thought I’d changed the time for the upload until I had time to edit it.

 

The below is from a wonderful post by Ginny, which turned my crank about three weeks ago. The quote below is from the movie, The Adjustment Bureau.

Most people live life on the path we set for them, too afraid to explore any other. But once in a while people like you come along who knock down all the obstacles we put in your way. People who realize freewill is a gift that you’ll never know how to use until you fight for it. I think that’s the chairman’s real plan. That maybe one day, we won’t write the plan, you will.

The below is what Ginny wrote about the movie, which inspired me:

Right?  If you think about it, our families, our friends, our social environment all serve as The Adjustment Bureau.  When we step off the grid a bit, they are quick to try and rein us back in.  What ensues is usually so unpleasant we become afraid of stepping off again. But there are some people who just don’t give a crap what others think or feel and grasp their own fate by the throat and just take it.  They just take it.  And they do so with no other proof, no other evidence than the gnawing in their entrails that tells them there’s more for them over there, doing it this other way.

I am one of those people. For whatever reason, I stepped off the grid, escaped the hammering that the culture I grew up in (middle class, 1960s Texan Conservative Religious) gave me. I did not escape the interior hammering, though — I beat myself up with it for years. Not so much today, but I still can hurt myself when I forget that the ‘normal’ I was born into is not the ‘normal’ for me.

One thing that makes it easier for people like me to step off the grid of societal expectations is finding one’s tribe. In high school my original tribe was the band. I was a Band Geek. I was good at it, and I loved the camaraderie. Later, in college, my tribe was ‘music major’. Then it was ‘professional musician’ – and still is. Today I’ve joined another tribe: unpublished writer (what a fun bunch WE are!), though I haven’t joined Triberr. (grin)

More importantly, I hope that at fifty-four I’ll soon be able to be a tribe of one… in relation with your tribe of one. My parents’ generation believes that to love each other, we must like the same things, believe the same things, value the same things… BE the same. I’m not sure that my generation has totally escaped that, but the one after us has. They understand that when we are truly ourselves, then we can truly be with another, making that choice to be together. And creativity is spawned from the friction inherent in the differences.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

4 responses

12 06 2012
KM Huber

I cheered every word of this post. Frankly, it has added immensely to my day, and I thank you for both. Great post, Julia.
Karen

12 06 2012
Julia Indigo

Thank you for commenting, Karen. You made my day!

12 06 2012
Karen McFarland

Great post Julia! You and I are the same age girl. So we were both brought up with similiar values. I came from the Cleaver household. LOL! But hey, what is normal Julia? Is there such a thing. You’re happy and that’s what’s important. And you’ve surrounded yourself with supportive people. You’re making music and writing which are two of the most important things you love. Can’t get much better than that. Well, except for our health. Oh well. Life is good! How are you Julia? Great to see you. 🙂

P.S. I’m not on Triberr either.

13 06 2012
Julia Indigo

Hi Karen,
I think that ‘normal’ is what works for you (versus what we were taught). I thought we were close to the same age.
I just joined pinterest. Why? As though I have time for THAT, too!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: